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2018-07-11 / News

Invasive Species Awareness Week


Shown here are several invasive species. Those who see them should report them to DEC, DAM. and other organizations listed here. 
Photo Courtesy of DEC Shown here are several invasive species. Those who see them should report them to DEC, DAM. and other organizations listed here. Photo Courtesy of DEC The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets have announced, with a Governor’s state proclamation that July 8-14 is the state’s fifth annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW).

ISAW is an annual campaign that encourages New Yorkers to help protect the state’s land and waters from the negative impacts of invasive species. The theme of this year’s campaign is “What YOU can do to help stop the spread!”, focusing on simple actions people can take to keep these unwanted species from hitchhiking to new areas.

During ISAW, citizens have ample opportunities to learn how to identify, survey, manage and map invasive species. There are morte than 100 ISAW events being held across the state.

Invasive species are plants, Animals, insects and pathogens that are not native to an area and cause harm to the environment or human health, These pests are one of the greatest threats to New York’s biodiversity, and residents can help to stop their spread.

Initiated in 2014, ISAW is one component of a larger invasive species education campaign, “Stop the Invasion:Protect NY from Invasive Species,” coordinated by the Invasive Species Council, Invasive Species Advisory Committee, and the Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISMs). Last year, more than 150 events were held statewide, attracting more than 6,000 participants.

This year, such an event is being held at 10 a.m. on Friday, July 13 at the Shavertown Trail, in the town of Andes and close to the Pepacton Reservoir, along with the ribboncutting of the boot-brush station which is being installed by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and is in partnership with the Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership.

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